I am a QUINN’tern — Victoria Rutigliano

Victoria likes the idea of winning her own Emmy but will make do holding on to this one won by a "Chronicle" producer for now.

Victoria likes the idea of winning her own Emmy but will make do holding on to this one won by a “Chronicle” producer for now.

Rising QU junior Victoria Rutigliano is spending her summer interning at “Chronicle”, a nightly local newsmagazine television show produced by WCVB-TV/Channel 5 in Boston. She tells us she loves being able to spend time on assignment with producers for the long-time local ABC program. She gets to watch people be interviewed and see behind the scenes of field reporting.

“Honestly, the coolest thing has been sitting in the studio and watching the on-air talent do live broadcasts,” Rutigliano says.

As a “Chronicle” intern, Rutigliano is responsible for archiving the show that was aired the previous night and helping the show producers log it. She also answers emails and phone calls from viewers and searches through countless databases for archived video.

“It’s surreal to see the people my family has been watching on TV—and will be watching on TV come dinner time—live in front of me doing a broadcast,” she adds.

Rutigliano says her classes and involvement with Q30 Television have helped her in many ways. She became familiar with media software like ENPS and Adobe Premiere Pro before she began her internship and those skills have helped her tremendously.

Channel 5, with its studios actually in suburban Needham, is a Hearst-owned station and a long-time ratings leader in news and news programming in the Boston market.

Channel 5, with its studios actually in suburban Needham, is a Hearst owned station and a long-time ratings leader in news and news programming in the Boston market.

“Chronicle” unit manager and production coordinator Kathleen Kiely is pleased with Rutigliano’s performance thus far.

“We love having her here at “Chronicle,” Kiely says. “Usually when students begin the “Chronicle” internship, there is a bit of a learning curve, but Victoria jumped right into her position here.”

Kiely also says though Rutigliano has only been at the station for a few weeks, she is someone the producers can count on.

Victoria poses with Anthony Everett, an anchor of the show, which has been on the air for 34 years.

Victoria poses with Anthony Everett, an anchor of the show, which has been on the air for 34 years.


Something that has fascinated Rutigliano at her internship is the technological advances of the studio she works in. The cameras are essentially computer operated with just one person controlling them all. The anchors also use iPads at the desk so they can quickly update their script if anything changes.

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–reported and written by Ayah Galal, journalism and political science double major, class of ‘18


Categories: School of Communications

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